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A Change to LastPass Premium

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For over a decade, we’ve been dedicated to providing you with a powerful solution that makes it easy to manage your passwords and protect your digital life.  

Starting today, LastPass Premium will be $36 per year for new customers. For existing users, your subscription will renew at the new $36 list price.  

In addition to our Premium offering, our personal lineup also includes LastPass Families, which provides 6 licenses of LastPass for $48. This allows you to share LastPass with up to 5 other people – a great way to protect your loved ones! With Families, you can store and share passwords for entertainment sites, medical accounts and credit cards, and organize them into folders by family member or type of account so everyone has the access they need.  

In today’s age of ever-changing security threats, the value of a best-in-class password manager cannot be overstated. LastPass helps all customers create unique, strong passwords for every account, and store them in a secure vault, keeping you safe from 3rd party breaches. Our LastPass security challenge and password generator help you identify weak or reused passwords and create new strong ones. LastPass also helps prevent successful phishing attempts by only filling in your credentials on authentic websites.  

In addition to standard LastPass features like a secure vault, autofill on sites and in apps, password sharing, and free syncing across devices, LastPass Premium offers exceptional features that are becoming more and more necessary in today’s digital landscape. These features allow you to:   

  • Share passwords with anyone: Premium lets you share passwords, notes and other vault items with multiple people to give everyone convenient but secure access.  
  • Protect yourself in an emergency: Make your account – and all your digital assets – safely available to another LastPass user of your choice.  
  • Ensure fast, reliable support: We know our Premium customers are very engaged with LastPass and often have questions to ensure they’re getting the full value out of the product. We push our Premium customers’ support tickets to the top of the queue.  
  • Protect your account with advanced MFA options: Take security to the next level with multi-factor through Yubikey, Sesame, and laptop fingerprint authentication. 
  • Have room to store everything: Backup and store encrypted files, like tax returns, passports, photo IDs, and membership cards with 1 GB of encrypted file storage.  

We’re continually working to evolve our product and meet our customers’ digital security needs. This past year, production improvements have included things like a better mobile autofill experience no matter the user’s mobile operating system and increased security by offering a wider breadth of advanced multifactor authentication options, such as YubiKey for iOS and Microsoft Authenticator.  

As always, we are truly grateful for your loyalty and continued support which allows us to drive innovation and bring you a product that you love.

The post A Change to LastPass Premium appeared first on The LastPass Blog.

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richard4339
303 days ago
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Figures, my renewal is in a few days. And this is a monumental price increase.
Sycamore, IL
fencepost
298 days ago
When they were bought by LogMeIn I expected this - not just the immediate price increase but additional ones, because that's how LogMeIn works (see previous years increases for the main product and GoToMyPC) - repeated doubling or tripling of prices.
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2 public comments
triss
305 days ago
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sure, make everything more expensive while neglecting eg the browser plugins and having frequent server issues. Good thing I was moving to Bitwarden anyhow: cheaper, open source and possibility to self-host!
DMack
305 days ago
After many years with LP, I just dumped them for 1password myself. (Just because their software is in rough shape. I was using LP for free and now I'm paying for 1P and it's great lol)
fxer
306 days ago
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Hmmmmm.
Bend, Oregon
dreadhead
304 days ago
I recently ditched lastpass (free) for bitwarden and it been great! I did not realize how bad the browser extension for lastpass was.

Tasks

9 Comments and 32 Shares
In the 60s, Marvin Minsky assigned a couple of undergrads to spend the summer programming a computer to use a camera to identify objects in a scene. He figured they'd have the problem solved by the end of the summer. Half a century later, we're still working on it.
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richard4339
1903 days ago
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It's so true.
Sycamore, IL
popular
1903 days ago
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6 public comments
jshaw49
1879 days ago
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made me think of you
orpheus17d
1898 days ago
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Once had a non-programmer ask me "it's just a button, how hard can it be!?" Maybe the button automatically finds a target and fires a cruise missle...at that guy's house :-P
tedder
1903 days ago
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omg. the story of being a developer with nontechnical program managers.
Uranus
brico
1903 days ago
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This
Brooklyn, NY
jimwise
1903 days ago
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Alt text isn't really fair -- the "block world" was a constrained example, and got to work really, really well.

And some of the other early computer vision stuff showed great results. But our idea of what we can do scales with the hardware, so, yeah.
marcrichter
1903 days ago
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Title text: In the 60s, Marvin Minsky assigned a couple of undergrads to spend the summer programming a computer to use a camera to identify objects in a scene. He figured they'd have the problem solved by the end of the summer. Half a century later, we're still working on it.
tbd
ZeroEffect
1903 days ago
Have been reading a bit about AI and what it takes to get a computer to try to do this, and what really impresses me is how easily our brains do it (to the point that it's hard to get them to stop doing it).

EA Announces Netflix-Like Subscription Plan On Xbox One

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EA Announces Netflix-Like Subscription Plan On Xbox One

Today EA announced a new subscription service for the Xbox One that will give customers unlimited access to a handful of the company's games for $4.99 a month.

Read more...

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richard4339
1959 days ago
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And to handle users who wish to cancel, we've contracted out to Comcast's retention department...
Sycamore, IL
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We Need More Customer Service Reps Like Capt. Mike Of The Good Ship Netflix

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We’re always hearing complaints about robotic customer service reps who refuse to deviate from a script — this is especially true in chat support, where CSRs sometimes have an entire library of go-to cut-and-paste replies at the ready. So it’s refreshing when we come across a story about a CSR who is willing to shake things up by using bringing a bit of humor to the job while also doing his job.

Over on Reddit, someone has posted the transcript of a chat between a Netflix customer and a rep named Michael, or as he refers to himself “Captain Mike of the good ship Netflix.”

What makes the conversation even more refreshing is that the customer plays along, referring to himself as Lt. Norman. You can read the whole thing below, but here is one choice exchange from the conversation, which involved a Parks and Recreation episode that was getting stuck and repeating the same few seconds (video evidence from yet another Netflix customer):

Customer: at 5 minutes of operation… the visual creates a temporal loop, and nearly 3 seconds of footage repeats over and over again. Our ship seems to be immune to the effect, as our lives are not actually repeating over and over.

Cap’n Mike: Oh, no LT I told you no watching Netflix while we sail through the [Bermuda] Triangle.

Customer: Dammit, I’m an engineer, not a navigator

In the Reddit comments, a user claiming to be Lt. Norman says he truly enjoyed the chat and that “even more interaction would have been awesomer. I think he didn’t expect me to take him up on the ‘invitation’ to be silly.”

And that’s exactly what makes this case such a pleasant change of pace — the CSR kept things light from the very beginning, but didn’t do anything to push the customer away or get him offline as quickly as possible, even though there was not much Mike could have done beyond reporting it to the tech team to investigate.

Sadly, a number of people in the Reddit comments express the sentiment that most companies would fire or at least reprimand a CSR who tried to bring a bit of levity to the proceedings.

There are obviously situations where joking around might be a big risk — most people contacting an insurance companies would probably not no what to make of being greeted in this way. But companies make the mistake of confusing “businesslike” and “scripted.”

Customer service work should be a true craft, in which the best CSRs are constantly adjusting their responses to the individual customer’s personality and the needs of each case. If CSRs are not allow to occasionally demonstrate they are human, how can they all be expected to treat customers like human beings?

Here’s the full version of the Netflix transcript:
e0LcT6J


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richard4339
2251 days ago
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Best customer service experience ever
Sycamore, IL
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Bouncy Balls

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Bouncy Balls

What if one were to drop 3,000 bouncy balls from a seven story parking structure onto a person walking on the sidewalk below? Should the person survive, what would be the number of bouncy balls needed to kill them? What injuries would occur and what would the associated crimes be?

—Ginger Bread

After falling from seven stories, the mass of bouncy balls would be moving at about 20 meters per second.

20 meters per second is about how fast an average person with a good arm could throw a bouncy ball. Therefore, to determine the result of an impact, we can make use of what Einstein called a gedankenexperiment, or "thought experiment":

In science, it's important that results be repeatable, so let's try that again:

The tricky thing about this scenario is that 3,000 one-inch bouncy balls is not as many as you probably think—it'd be enough to fill a large bucket.

This bucket would weigh about as much as a small child, which leads us to another gedankenexperiment:

Of course, in reality, the average person can't throw a small child as fast as they can throw a bouncy ball.[citation needed] Furthermore, they won't all fall in one clump. If you poured the balls from a container, they would bounce around and spread out as they fell, and most of them would probably miss the target.

This effect was demonstrated in an experiment by Utah State University students, who poured 20,000 bouncy balls from a helicopter as part of their Geek Week. The balls fell as a cloud, rather than a single mass.

If you wanted to be sure of killing someone, you'd need a lot more balls. 3,000,000 of them—enough to fill a large room—would be be enough to guarantee that the target would either be crushed to death by the impact or buried too deep to dig themselves out.

To your last question, if someone just happened to walk underneath when you dropped the bouncy balls, and they were killed by the impact, you'd most likely be guilty of some form of manslaughter.

However, by asking this question, you've shown your intent to cause harm to the victim, demonstrating clear malice aforethought. By writing in to this blog, you've probably upgraded your charge to murder.

All in all, you should probably stick to gedankenexperiments.

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richard4339
2351 days ago
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This might be my favorite what if.
Sycamore, IL
popular
2351 days ago
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8 public comments
internetionals
2330 days ago
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Look out solar system, here we come...
Netherlands
euge521
2351 days ago
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it is for adults ...
marten
2351 days ago
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Shared because of the second illustration. But disappointed at the lack of a reference to the Sony Bravia commercial from 2005.
Groningen
knicpfost
2351 days ago
that is the only commercial i have ever saved to my hard drive to watch repeatedly.
fredw
2343 days ago
link?
knicpfost
2343 days ago
http://vimeo.com/14504562 ... turn on HD!
fredw
2343 days ago
Thank you!
knowtheory
2351 days ago
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I'm beginning to suspect that WhatIf is just an excuse to search youtube for unusual videos.
tedder
2352 days ago
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had me at "the average person can't throw a small child as fast as they can throw a bouncy ball.".
Uranus
JimRPh
2351 days ago
Actually, it leads to the "how many small children" question.
mkalus
2352 days ago
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:)
iPhone: 49.287476,-123.142136
stavrosg
2352 days ago
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This.
Rodos, Greece
rclatterbuck
2352 days ago
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.
ksteimle
2352 days ago
Point of fact: the link for "citation needed" points to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cetacean Randall Munroe is awesome.
jheald1
2352 days ago
Point of fact: the link to Wikipedia's "citation needed" page includes an xkcd comic. :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Citation_needed
ksteimle
2352 days ago
Ha! how awesome!
rgsunico
2352 days ago
Crazy!